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Guide:on how to care and grow calla lilies

Long considered a representation of new life and resurrection, calla lilies are closely linked to the Easter season. Modern hybrids occur in a variety of hues in addition to the basic species’ all-white blossoms. The long-blooming flowers, commonly referred to as spathes, provide enduring colour to pots, borders, mass plantings, and cut flower bouquets. This tropical plant, which is grown from rhizomes, is also offered as a houseplant at flower shops.

Although calla lilies are not technically lilies, they do have many of their characteristics, including being sensual, graceful, seductive, and exotic, which has many gardeners shocked at how simple it may be to produce and take care of these flowers.

Zantedeschia spp. and hybrids, botanical name

Z. aethiopica can be grown in Zones 8 through 10, but hybrids prefer Zone 9 and warmer climates. Alternatively, in cooler locations, treat them as annuals.

Height/Spread: 12 to 36 inches tall and 9 to 24 inches broad; upright habit.

Full sun to partial shade; bright, indirect light is preferred. Bud count may suffer under dense shade, yet searing summer light at noon might be equally difficult.

Bloom period: Around eight weeks after planting, flower stalks start to emerge, and over the following two months, you’ll be pleased by blossoms.

Guide:on how to care and grow calla lilies

The calla lily is a perennial herbaceous or semi-evergreen plant that is cultivated from rhizomes. The heart of tubular, pointed-tipped flowers is a long spadix that resembles a finger. White, yellow, orange, pink, red, purple, green, and black are some of the colors that blooms can be. Above broad, solid green or speckled leaves, tall, graceful stems rise. (Click on image to buy)

Do calla lilies have poison?
If any portion of the calla lily plant is consumed, it can be extremely harmful to both humans and animals. Sap may irritate the skin or the eyes. Put on gloves and handle plants with care.

Plant your callas whenever you like between February and June (but after danger of frost is past).

Where to plant: Pick a place with improved, well-drained soil that is sunny to moderately shaded.

How to plant: Directly in the garden or in pots, bury the tuber-like rhizomes 3 to 4 inches deep in porous soil.

The ideal temperature range for this tropical plant is between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. The calla lily needs cover from the intense afternoon sun since it prefers moist, humid environments. When the temperature drops below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, plants will go dormant. Rhizomes shouldn’t freeze.

Hybrids prefer a permeable, well-drained soil. If you apply fertiliser, sandy soils are good; clay soils might be challenging. Use an all-purpose, high-quality potting mix for the containers.

Watering: Hybrid callas prefer slightly moist soil, so only water them when the earth is just beginning to feel dry.

Additions and fertiliser: Use a slow-release fertiliser when planting. A surplus of nitrogen will promote numerous leaves and tall stems, suppressing the growth of buds.

Deadheading: To straighten up plants, cut off spent blooms and remove damaged or discoloured leaves.

Biological soft rot, botrytis, powdery mildew, grey mould, blight, leaf spot, dasheen mosaic virus, spotted wilt, and armillaria rot are just a few of the diseases that can affect plants. Slugs, Japanese beetles, aphids, spider mites, and thrips are a few examples of pests.

Winter preparation: In early winter or in the autumn before frost threatens:

When the foliage on potted callas begins to turn yellow, cut it back to the ground and move the pots indoors to a cool, dry space so the rhizomes may rest.
For callas planted in the ground, remove the foliage after it turns yellow, dig up the rhizomes, and store them in a dry place at 55°F.
Water should be withheld for eight weeks or longer before adding light and water to restart.

Soil Hybrids prefer a permeable, well-drained soil. If you apply fertiliser, sandy soils are good; clay soils might be challenging. Use an all-purpose, high-quality potting mix for the containers.

Pest and diseases

Biological soft rot, botrytis, powdery mildew, grey mould, blight, leaf spot, dasheen mosaic virus, spotted wilt, and armillaria rot are just a few of the diseases that can affect plants. Slugs, Japanese beetles, aphids, spider mites, and thrips are a few examples of pests.

Winter preparation: In early winter or in the autumn before frost threatens:

potted care :When the foliage on potted callas begins to turn yellow, cut it back to the ground and move the pots indoors to a cool, dry space so the rhizomes may rest.


For callas planted in the ground, remove the foliage after it turns yellow, dig up the rhizomes, and store them in a dry place at 55°F.
Water should be withheld for eight weeks or longer before adding light and water to restart the cycle.

DESIGN SUGGESTIONS FOR CALLAFLOWERS:

Use calla lilies in bulk plantings, mixed borders, along streams, or in bogs for borders and landscapes.

for hillsides and slopes: By itself, as a mass along a slope, or in conjunction with other plants.

for containers:

In a pot as an indoor houseplant or outdoors during the warmer months, calla lilies can be grown. Plant on its own or alongside other plants that have comparable cultural requirements.

You may use calla lilies in a variety of ways to decorate your house or yard. This is how:

To enjoy the blooms up close, plant in a decorative container by itself or with other plants that have comparable needs. Place the container on a patio or deck.
In a living room or kitchen where the flowers will be routinely enjoyed, place a houseplant close to a bright window.
Enjoy cut calla lily spathes for a classy arrangement in a tall, slim vase.
For enduring summer colour, place plants near the front of a mixed border, while other perennials and shrubs are in the background

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