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Exposed Orchid Killer – Household Gases That Kill Your Orchids.

Exposed Orchid Killer – Household Gases That Kill Your Orchids

Are you a proud owner of orchids but can’t seem to keep them alive no matter how much you care for them? Well, what if I told you that the killer of your orchids might be lurking in your own home?

That’s right!  Household gases such as carbon monoxide, ethylene, and formaldehyde are the culprits behind the mysterious death of your precious orchids. These invisible killers seep into your home through everyday items like gas stoves, heating systems, and even certain types of furniture.

But how can you protect your orchids from these deadly gases? It’s simple—just arm yourself with knowledge! By understanding which household items emit these gases and how to properly ventilate your home, you can keep your orchids thriving for years to come.

Exposed Orchid Killer - Household Gases That Kill Your Orchids.

So the next time you see your orchids wilting away, don’t blame yourself. Instead, turn your attention to the dangerous gases that may be lurking in your home and take action to protect your beloved plants.

Household gases that kills your orchids

Ethylene Gas: Ethylene gas is a plant hormone that is naturally produced by fruits, flowers, and other plant parts as they ripen. Exposure to high levels of ethylene gas can cause orchid flowers and buds to drop prematurely and also cause yellowing of leaves. Sources of ethylene gas in households include ripening fruits, aging flowers, and faulty gas appliances.

Carbon monoxide :is a colorless, flavorless, and odourless gas that is created when fuels like natural gas, propane, and petroleum are burned. Orchids are susceptible to wilting, yellowing, and ultimately death when exposed to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. Gas-powered devices, automobiles, and generators are some home sources of carbon monoxide.

Formaldehyde: Formaldehyde is a colorless gas with a pungent smell that is commonly found in household products such as pressed-wood products, plywood, and some types of insulation. Exposure to formaldehyde can cause orchid leaves to turn yellow and fall off, and it can also damage flowers and buds.

Chlorine Gas: Chlorine gas is a yellow-green gas with a strong, pungent odor that is commonly used in household cleaning products, swimming pools, and hot tubs. Exposure to high levels of chlorine gas can cause orchid leaves to turn yellow and drop off, and it can also damage flowers and buds.

Ammonia: Ammonia is a colorless gas with a strong, pungent odor that is commonly found in cleaning products, urine, and animal waste. Exposure to high levels of ammonia can cause orchid leaves to curl, turn yellow, and eventually die. Sources of ammonia in households include cleaning products, cat litter boxes, and animal cages.

Sulfur Dioxide: Sulfur dioxide is a colorless gas with a pungent odor that is produced by burning fuels such as coal and oil. Exposure to high levels of sulfur dioxide can cause orchid leaves to yellow and brown, and it can also damage flowers and buds. Sources of sulfur dioxide in households include gas appliances and heating systems

Ozone: Ozone is a colorless gas with a strong odor that is produced by electrical equipment such as photocopiers, air purifiers, and ozone generators. Exposure to high levels of ozone can cause orchid leaves to turn brown and brittle, and it can also damage flowers and buds.

To protect your orchids from these harmful household gases, it’s important to keep them away from sources of gas and ensure good air circulation in your home. You can also use air purifiers with HEPA filters to reduce the levels of harmful gases in your home. Additionally, it’s important to avoid using chemical cleaning products near your orchids and to use natural alternatives instead.

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs): VOCs are gases that are released from many household products such as paints, solvents, adhesives, and cleaning products. Exposure to high levels of VOCs can cause orchid leaves to yellow and brown, and it can also damage flowers and buds. To reduce the levels of VOCs in your home, consider using low-VOC products or natural alternatives.

Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen dioxide is a reddish-brown gas with a pungent odor that is produced by gas stoves, heaters, and cars. Exposure to high levels of nitrogen dioxide can cause orchid leaves to turn yellow and brown, and it can also damage flowers and buds. To reduce the levels of nitrogen dioxide in your home, make sure your gas appliances are properly maintained and ventilated.

Radon: Radon is a radioactive gas that is produced by the natural decay of uranium in soil, rocks, and water. Exposure to high levels of radon can cause orchid leaves to turn yellow and brown, and it can also damage flowers and buds. To reduce the levels of radon in your home, consider testing your home for radon and taking steps to mitigate it if necessary.

Overall, it’s important to be aware of the various household gases that can be harmful to orchids and take steps to protect them from exposure. By keeping your home well-ventilated, avoiding sources of gas, and using natural alternatives to chemical products, you can help keep your orchids healthy and thriving.

Hydrogen Sulfide: Hydrogen sulfide is a colorless gas with a strong, rotten egg odor that is produced by bacteria and the decay of organic matter. Exposure to high levels of hydrogen sulfide can cause orchid leaves to turn yellow and brown, and it can also damage flowers and buds. Sources of hydrogen sulfide in households include sewage systems, septic tanks, and compost piles.

Methane: Methane is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced by the decay of organic matter and the burning of fossil fuels. Exposure to high levels of methane can cause orchid leaves to turn yellow and brown, and it can also damage flowers and buds. Sources of methane in households include gas appliances, landfills, and sewage systems.

How to save orchids from this gases

To save orchids from the harmful effects of household gases, there are several steps you can take:

    Provide good ventilation: Make sure your orchids are in a well-ventilated area, and open windows and doors to allow fresh air to circulate.  This will help to reduce the concentration of harmful gases in the air.

    Use natural alternatives: Choose natural alternatives to chemical cleaning products, air fresheners, and fertilisers to reduce the amount of harmful gases in your home.

    Regularly maintain gas appliances: Have your gas appliances regularly maintained and inspected by a qualified professional to ensure they are functioning properly and not emitting harmful gases.

    Test for radon: Have your home tested for radon, and take steps to seal any cracks in the foundation to prevent the gas from entering your home.

    Avoid exposure to outdoor air pollution: Reduce your exposure to outdoor air pollution by closing windows and doors during times of high pollution, and consider using air purifiers with HEPA filters.

Plants which can help Remove gases

There are several plants that can help remove indoor air pollutants, including gases, from your home. Here are a few examples:

Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum): This plant is excellent at removing formaldehyde, benzene, carbon monoxide, and xylene from the air.

:Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis): Aloe vera not only looks great in your home, but it also removes formaldehyde and benzene from the air.


English Ivy (Hedera helix): English ivy is great for removing benzene, formaldehyde, and trichloroethylene from the air.

Peace lilies (Spathiphyllum wallisii) are beautiful, low-maintenance plants that effectively remove harmful gases like formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene from indoor air. Their elegant white flowers bloom year-round, making them an excellent choice for adding a touch of calmness and tranquility to any space.

Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii): The bamboo palm is a great plant for removing formaldehyde, benzene, and carbon monoxide from the air.

What things kill orchids?

Overwatering, Underwatering, Lack of light, Extreme temperatures, Pests.

Will hydrogen peroxide harm orchids?

It can harm them if used excessively or at high concentrations.

Are orchids sensitive to chemicals?

Yes, they are sensitive to chemicals and can be easily damaged by fertilizers or pesticides.

Will salt kill orchids?

Yes, salt buildup in soil can harm or kill orchids.

What do orchids hate?

They hate cold temperatures, overwatering, direct sunlight, and drafts.

What is the secret to keeping orchids alive?

Consistent watering, proper lighting, and appropriate fertilization.

How do you stop orchids from killing?

Avoid overwatering and using chemical pesticides or fertilizers

What not to do to orchids?

Do not expose them to extreme temperatures or direct sunlight, and avoid over-fertilizing or overwatering.

How to get rid of white aphids on orchids?

Use a mixture of water and dish soap or rubbing alcohol to spray affected areas.

How to revive rootless orchid?

Place the plant in a small container of water and wait for roots to grow before repotting in fresh soil.

Neglected orchids?

Provide adequate lighting, water, and fertilization and remove any dead or damaged parts

Home remedy for mealybugs on orchids ?

Use a mixture of water, dish soap, and alcohol to spray affected areas.

Orchid crown broke off?

If possible, try to propagate the broken crown and repot the original plant in fresh soil.

How to care for an old orchid?

Provide adequate lighting, water, and fertilization, and trim any dead or damaged roots.

How to repot a sick orchid?

Gently remove the plant from its current pot, trim any damaged roots, and repot it in fresh soil with appropriate drainage.

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