12 Common Garden Pests: How to Spot and Stop Them

pexels erik karits 13223612 scaled

12 Common Garden Pests: How to Spot and Stop Them

Maintaining a thriving garden can be incredibly rewarding, but the battle against garden pests can sometimes feel like a never-ending struggle. From nibbling insects to crawling critters, these unwelcome visitors can wreak havoc on your carefully cultivated plants. In this guide, we’ll introduce you to 12 common garden pests, help you identify them, and provide effective strategies to stop their damage in its tracks.

Aphids

Aphids, those small and often pesky insects, can become a real nuisance in your garden. These tiny, pear-shaped creatures have a knack for sucking the sap out of your plants, leaving them weakened and vulnerable. While they might seem harmless individually, aphids can multiply rapidly and cause significant damage if left unchecked.

Identification:Green, black, brown, and even pink are just a few of the colours that aphids can be.
They usually gather in clusters on the undersides of leaves or near the tips of new growth. Their feeding can cause leaves to curl, yellow, or become distorted, and you might also notice a sticky substance called “honeydew” on leaves or surfaces beneath infested plants. Honeydew can attract ants and mould, further complicating the situation.

Prevention and Control:
Thankfully, there are several effective methods for preventing and controlling aphid infestations:

Water Pressure: Use a strong stream of water from a hose to knock aphids off the plants. This method can be particularly effective for small infestations and won’t harm beneficial insects.

Beneficial Insects: Encourage natural predators like ladybirds, lacewings, and parasitic wasps that feed on aphids. Plant nectar-rich blooms nearby to entice these useful insects.

Neem Oil: Neem oil is a natural insecticide that disrupts aphids’ growth and development. Apply it to the plants that need it by combining it with water.

Insecticidal Soap: These soaps are specifically formulated to kill soft-bodied insects like aphids. Keep in mind to adhere to the label’s recommendations for effective application.

Diatomaceous Earth: This powdery substance damages the outer shells of aphids and other insects. Dust it on your plants, focusing on the undersides of the leaves.

Reflective Mulch: Reflective mulch, like aluminium foil, can confuse aphids and deter them from settling on your plants.

Preventing Future Infestations:
Regularly inspect your plants for signs of aphids and take proactive measures to ensure a healthy garden environment.

Plant Diversity: Avoid monoculture planting, as a diverse garden can attract a variety of insects that help keep aphid populations in check.

Prune Infested Areas: If you spot aphids, consider pruning affected plant parts to prevent the infestation from spreading.

Healthy Plants: Maintain healthy plants through proper watering, fertilisation, and soil health. Strong plants are better equipped to resist aphid attacks.

By understanding aphid behaviour and implementing preventive measures, you can keep these tiny invaders from wreaking havoc in your garden and enjoy a thriving, pest-free green space

12 Common Garden Pests: How to Spot and Stop Them

Slugs and snails:

Slugs and snails, while seemingly harmless, can quickly turn into garden pests that wreak havoc on your plants. These slimy creatures are known for their voracious appetites and can leave a trail of destruction in their wake. Learning how to identify, manage, and control slugs and snails is essential to maintaining a healthy garden.

Identification:
Slugs and snails are mollusks that thrive in damp and moist environments. They are most active during the night and on cloudy days. You might find them leaving behind telltale silvery trails on plant leaves and surfaces. The damage they cause includes irregular holes in leaves and partially eaten fruits and seedlings.

Prevention and Control:
To keep slugs and snails from turning your garden into their buffet, consider these strategies:

Handpicking: Head out to the garden in the evening or early morning with a flashlight and pluck slugs and snails from plants. Dispose of them in a bucket of soapy water.

Barriers: Create physical barriers to deter these pests. Options include copper tape around plant pots and raised beds, as slugs and snails receive a mild electric shock when they come into contact with copper.

Diatomaceous Earth: Sprinkle diatomaceous earth around plants as a natural abrasive that cuts through the pests’ soft bodies.

Beer Traps: Sink shallow containers filled with beer into the soil. Slugs and snails are attracted to the smell, fall in, and drown.

Natural Predators: Encourage predators like frogs, toads, birds, and ground beetles, which feast on slugs and snails.

Coffee Grounds: Sprinkling used coffee grounds around your plants can create an abrasive barrier that slugs and snails avoid.

Cultural Practises:
In addition to direct control methods, consider incorporating these practises to reduce slug and snail activity:

Reduce Moisture: Keep your garden dry, as slugs and snails thrive in damp conditions. Avoid overwatering and water plants in the morning rather than the evening.

Elevate Plants: Raise containers and planters off the ground to make it more difficult for slugs and snails to reach your plants.

Clear Debris: Remove hiding spots such as piles of leaves, rocks, and boards where these pests might seek shelter during the day.

Mulching: Use dry and coarse mulch, such as straw or wood chips, to create an environment that slugs and snails dislike.

By implementing a combination of control methods and cultural practises, you can effectively manage slug and snail populations in your garden. Remember that consistent vigilance and early action are key to preventing these pests from causing significant damage to your plants.

Caterpillars

Caterpillars, those curious and often colourful larvae of butterflies and moths, can sometimes become a threat to your garden plants. While some caterpillars are harmless and even beneficial, others can voraciously feed on leaves, flowers, and fruits, potentially causing significant damage. Learning to differentiate between various caterpillars and adopting appropriate management techniques can help you maintain a healthy garden ecosystem.

Identification:
Caterpillars come in various sizes, colours, and patterns. They have a distinct, segmented body with three pairs of true legs and additional prolegs. Some caterpillars might have spines or hairs that can cause skin irritation, so it’s important to handle them with care. Keep an eye out for signs of chewed leaves and missing plant parts, which could indicate caterpillar activity.

Prevention and Control:
To protect your garden from caterpillar damage, consider these strategies:

Handpicking: For small infestations, manually remove caterpillars from plants and relocate them away from your garden.

Biological Control: Encourage natural predators like birds, wasps, and beneficial insects such as parasitic wasps and ladybirds. These predators help keep caterpillar populations in check.

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt): Bt is a naturally occurring bacterium that acts as a biological insecticide. It specifically targets caterpillars and is safe for humans, pets, and beneficial insects.To apply the product correctly, according to the directions on the label.

Row Covers: Use lightweight row covers to physically block caterpillars from accessing your plants. Make sure the covers are securely anchored to prevent gaps.

Pruning: If you spot egg masses or clusters of caterpillars, consider pruning and disposing of the affected plant parts to prevent further infestation.

Attracting Beneficial Insects:
Encouraging natural predators is a great way to manage caterpillar populations. Here’s how you can attract them:

Plant Diversity: Create a diverse garden with a variety of plants that attract pollinators and predators.

Flowering Plants: Include nectar-rich flowering plants to attract beneficial insects like parasitic wasps and adult butterflies.

Shelter: Provide hiding spots like rock piles, brush piles, and mulch for beneficial insects to seek refuge.

Observation and Early Detection:
Frequent garden inspections are crucial for the early detection of caterpillar infestations. By identifying and addressing the problem early, you can prevent the caterpillars from causing extensive damage to your plants.

Remember, not all caterpillars are harmful. Some might eventually transform into beautiful butterflies or moths that contribute to pollination and the overall ecosystem. Balancing control measures with the natural diversity of your garden can help you maintain a healthy and vibrant outdoor space.

Japanese Beetles:

Japanese beetles are colourful but destructive insects that can cause significant damage to a wide range of plants. These metallic green beetles with copper-coloured wings are known for their voracious feeding habits and can quickly defoliate your garden if left unchecked. Here’s what you need to know about Japanese beetles:

Identification:
Japanese beetles are about 1/2 inch long with a distinctive metallic green body and coppery wings. They have small white tufts of hair along the sides of their bodies. You’ll often find them feeding in groups on leaves and flowers.

Damage:
Japanese beetles feed on the foliage, flowers, and fruits of various plants. They create irregular holes in leaves, often leaving only the veins intact. Their feeding can lead to a skeletonized appearance on affected plants. In severe infestations, plants can become weak and stressed.

Prevention and Control:
To manage Japanese beetle populations and protect your plants:

Handpicking: In small gardens, you can handpick the beetles off plants early in the morning when they are less active to stop them from coming back, submerge them in soapy water.

Use traps carefully: Japanese beetle traps can attract beetles from a distance, but they might also draw more beetles to your garden. Use traps sparingly and place them away from plants you want to protect.

Natural Predators: Encourage birds, such as starlings and robins, as well as beneficial insects like parasitic wasps and nematodes, which can help control Japanese beetle larvae in the soil.

Neem Oil: Neem oil can deter Japanese beetles and disrupt their feeding habits. Apply it to plants as directed on the product label.

Row Covers: Use lightweight row covers to physically prevent adult beetles from reaching your plants.

Cultural Practises:
Employ these practises to minimise Japanese beetle damage:

Select Resistant Plants: Choose plants that are less appealing to Japanese beetles. Research which plants they are less likely to attack.

Handpick early in the morning: Japanese beetles are sluggish in the morning, making them easier to catch.

Water wisely: Proper watering can help plants recover from beetle damage more quickly.

Monitor and Act: Regularly inspect your plants for signs of Japanese beetle activity. If you spot them, take action to prevent a larger infestation.

Consistency is key.
Consistency in control efforts is crucial since Japanese beetles can be persistent and have a short adult lifespan. By employing a combination of prevention methods and management strategies, you can help protect your garden from the damage caused by these determined pests.

Spider Mites:

Spider mites are tiny arachnids that can wreak havoc on plants by sucking their sap, causing discoloration, wilting, and even death if left uncontrolled. Despite their name, they’re not insects but rather closely related to spiders and ticks. What should you know about spider mites?

Identification:
Spider mites are incredibly small, usually less than 1/50th of an inch, making them difficult to see without a magnifying glass. They come in various colours, such as red, yellow, green, or brown, depending on the species and life stage. You might notice tiny webs on leaves where they feed, giving them their “spider” name.

Damage:
Spider mites obtain their food by puncturing plant cells and sucking out the interiors. This feeding causes a stippled or speckled appearance on leaves, giving them a silvery or yellowish cast. As the infestation progresses, leaves may turn brown, dry out, and fall prematurely. Severe infestations can weaken plants and impact their overall health.

Prevention and Control:
To manage and prevent spider mite infestations, consider the following strategies:

Regular Inspection: Regularly inspect the undersides of leaves for signs of mites, especially in dry and dusty conditions.

Water Blast: Use a strong stream of water to dislodge spider mites from plants. This method also helps improve humidity levels, which can deter mites.

Predatory Mites: Introduce predatory mites, such as Phytoseiulus persimilis, which feed on spider mites. These beneficial mites can help control the population.

Neem Oil: Neem oil can disrupt the life cycle of spider mites. Make sure to cover both the upper and lower leaf surfaces when applying.

Insecticidal Soap: Use insecticidal soap to suffocate spider mites. Thoroughly cover the leaves, as the soap needs to make contact with the pests to be effective.

Horticultural Oils: Apply horticultural oils to smother spider mites. Be cautious when using oils on plants that are sensitive to oil sprays.

Cultural Practises:
Implement these practises to prevent and manage spider mites:

Maintain Humidity: Spider mites thrive in dry conditions. Increasing humidity through misting or placing trays of water near plants can discourage them.

Isolate Infested Plants: Quarantine new plants before introducing them to your garden to prevent introducing spider mites.

Prune Infested Leaves: Remove heavily infested leaves to reduce the spread of mites.

Consistent Monitoring:
Since spider mites reproduce rapidly, consistent monitoring is essential. Early detection and intervention can prevent these pests from causing widespread damage to your plants. By combining different control methods and staying vigilant, you can keep spider mite populations in check and ensure the health of your garden.

Thrips

Thrips are tiny, slender insects that can become a headache for gardeners due to their piercing-sucking mouthparts and ability to damage a wide range of plants. These minuscule pests can be challenging to control because they can spread diseases and multiply rapidly.

Identification:
Thrips are slender, winged insects that measure about 1/16 to 1/8 inch in length. They come in various colours, from pale yellow or beige to dark brown or black. Thrips have fringed wings, and their small size and rapid movement can make them difficult to spot.

Damage:
Thrips damage plants by using their rasping mouthparts to pierce cells and suck out the contents. This feeding causes leaves to appear stippled, discoloured, or silvered. You might also notice distorted growth, curling leaves, and deformed flowers. Additionally, thrips can transmit plant viruses, making them a double threat to your garden.

Prevention and Control:
Managing thrips can be a multi-faceted approach that involves various strategies:

Regular Inspection: Inspect plants frequently for signs of thrips and the damage they cause.

Remove Weeds: Thrips can live on weeds, so removing weeds near your garden can help reduce their population.

Pruning: Prune and dispose of infested plant parts to limit thrips’ presence.

Beneficial Insects: Encourage natural predators like minute pirate bugs, lacewings, and predatory mites that feed on thrips.

Yellow Sticky Traps: Place yellow sticky traps near plants to capture adult thrips. The colour attracts them, and they become stuck to the trap’s adhesive surface.

Insecticidal Soap: Use insecticidal soap to target thrips. Make sure to cover the undersides of leaves, where thrips often hide.

Cultural Practises:
Incorporate these practises to minimise thrips infestations:

Reflective Mulch: Reflective mulch, like aluminium foil, can deter thrips from landing on plants.

Regular Watering: Regularly water plants to keep them healthy, as stressed plants are more susceptible to thrips damage.

Isolate New Plants: quarantine new plants before introducing them to your garden to prevent introducing thrips.

Early Detection:
Early detection is crucial in managing thrips since they reproduce rapidly. Monitoring your plants for any signs of thrips or the damage they cause will help you take action before the infestation becomes severe.

By combining prevention, cultural practises, and control methods, you can effectively manage thrips in your garden and protect your plants from their damaging effects.

Rodents

Rodents, such as rats and mice, can cause a range of problems in gardens and outdoor spaces. These small mammals can damage plants, eat crops, and even pose health risks to humans and pets. Here’s what you need to know about managing rodents in your garden:

Identification:
Rats and mice are small rodents with varying sizes, colours, and behaviours. Rats are larger, with long tails and pointed noses, while mice are smaller, with rounder bodies and larger ears. Rodents are usually nocturnal and may leave behind droppings, gnaw marks, and burrows as signs of their presence.

Damage:
Rodents can damage your garden in multiple ways.

Plant Damage: Rats and mice might nibble on the bark of trees and shrubs, gnaw on garden furniture, and chew through plant stems and roots.

Crop Loss: In vegetable gardens, rodents can eat fruits, vegetables, and seeds, leading to reduced yields.

Disease Transmission: Rodents can carry diseases such as leptospirosis and hantavirus, which can be transmitted to humans through contact with their urine, droppings, or bites.

Prevention and Control:
To manage rodents effectively, consider these strategies:

Sanitation: Keep your garden clean and tidy by removing fallen fruits, debris, and any potential hiding spots that rodents could use.

Sealing Entry Points: Block potential entry points to your garden and structures using materials like wire mesh, steel wool, and caulk.

Snap traps or live traps : can be used to capture rats. Bait the traps with food attractive to the specific type of rodent you’re targeting.

Predators: Encourage natural predators like owls, hawks, and snakes to keep rodent populations in check.

Repellents: Use scent-based repellents, such as predator urine or strong-smelling herbs, to deter rodents from your garden.

Cultural Practises:
Implement these practises to minimise the attractiveness of your garden to rodents:

Elevated Planting: Raise containers and planters off the ground to discourage rodents from accessing plants.

Composting: Ensure your compost pile is properly managed and doesn’t attract rodents.

Clean Bird Feeders: If you have bird feeders, clean up fallen seeds regularly, as they can attract rodents.

Regular Inspection:
Regularly inspect your garden for signs of rodent activity, such as gnaw marks, droppings, and burrows. Early detection can help you take action before the population grows out of control.

Integrated Approach:
Combining multiple strategies, like maintaining cleanliness, sealing entry points, using traps, and encouraging natural predators, can create an integrated approach to rodent management in your garden.

By implementing these practises, you can mitigate the negative impact of rodents on your garden while also creating a safer and more enjoyable outdoor space.

Scales

Scales are small, immobile insects that can infest various plants, causing damage by feeding on plant sap. They get their name from the protective scale-like coverings that shield their bodies. These pests can weaken plants, cause yellowing of the leaves, and sometimes even lead to plant death. Here’s what you need to know about scales:

Identification:
Scales appear as small, round, or oval bumps attached to plant stems, leaves, and even fruit. These bumps can range in colour from brown, black, or grey to white, yellow, or pink. Depending on the species, scales might have a hard or waxy covering that protects them from predators and environmental conditions.

Damage:
Scales feed on plant sap by inserting their mouthparts into plant tissues. Their feeding can cause leaves to yellow, wilt, and drop prematurely. Scales also excrete a sugary substance called honeydew, which can attract ants and encourage the growth of sooty mould.

Prevention and Control:
Managing scales requires a combination of preventive measures and control strategies.

Regular Inspection: Regularly inspect your plants for signs of scales, especially on the undersides of leaves and along stems.

Pruning: For small infestations, prune and discard heavily infested plant parts.

Mechanical Removal: Gently scrub scales off plants using a soft brush or cloth dipped in soapy water. This can be effective for light infestations.

Horticultural Oil: Apply horticultural oil during the dormant season to smother scales. Make sure to cover all infested plant parts.

Beneficial Insects: Encourage natural predators like ladybirds and parasitic wasps that feed on scales.

Insecticidal Soap: Use insecticidal soap to target scales. Thorough coverage of all infested areas is essential for effectiveness.

Cultural Practises:
Incorporate these practises to minimise scale infestations:

Prune and sanitise: regularly prune dead or infested plant material and dispose of it properly to prevent the spread of scales.

Maintain Plant Health: Healthy plants are less susceptible to scale infestations. Provide proper watering, nutrition, and soil care.

Monitor New Plants: Inspect new plants before introducing them to your garden to prevent introducing scales.

Consistency and timing:
Consistency in monitoring and taking action is key to managing scales effectively. Timing is especially important, as certain control measures are more effective during specific stages of the scale’s life cycle.

By combining different control methods and practising good garden hygiene, you can keep scale populations in check and maintain the health of your plants.

Leafhoppers

Leafhoppers are small, flying insects that can cause damage to a variety of plants by piercing and sucking plant sap from leaves. These agile pests can be challenging to control due to their quick movements and ability to transmit plant diseases. Here’s what you need to know about managing leafhoppers:

Identification:
Leafhoppers are usually less than 1/4 inch in length and come in various colours, including green, brown, and yellow. They have a distinctive shape, with wedge-like bodies and wings that are held like a roof over their backs. When disturbed, leafhoppers are known for their rapid jumping movements, making them difficult to catch.

Damage:
Leafhoppers damage plants by using their piercing-sucking mouthparts to extract plant sap. This feeding can cause stippling, yellowing, and curling of the leaves. In addition to the direct damage they cause, leafhoppers can transmit diseases to plants while feeding.

Prevention and Control:
To manage leafhoppers and protect your plants:

Regular Inspection: Regularly inspect your plants for signs of leafhopper activity, including stippled leaves and jumping insects.

Beneficial Insects: Encourage natural predators like ladybirds, lacewings, and parasitic wasps that feed on leafhoppers.

Reflective Mulch: Reflective mulch, like aluminium foil, can deter leafhoppers from landing on plants.

Row Covers: Use lightweight row covers to physically prevent adult leafhoppers from accessing your plants.

Insecticidal Soap: Apply insecticidal soap to target leafhoppers. Make sure to cover the undersides of leaves, where they often hide.

Cultural Practises:
Implement these practises to minimise leafhopper infestations:

Remove Weeds: Clear out weeds that might host leafhoppers and prevent them from spreading to your cultivated plants.

Plant Diversity: A diverse garden can attract natural predators and help control leafhopper populations.

Regular Watering: Adequate watering helps plants withstand leafhopper damage and minimise stress.

Early Detection:
Early detection is crucial in managing leafhoppers since they can reproduce quickly. Regularly inspecting your plants and identifying leafhopper activity can help you take action before the infestation becomes severe.

Integrated Approach:
By combining different strategies, such as encouraging predators, using physical barriers, and applying targeted treatments, you can manage leafhopper populations and keep your plants healthy.

Consistent vigilance and intervention are key to successfully managing leafhopper populations and maintaining the well-being of your garden.

Mealybugs

Mealybugs are small, soft-bodied insects that can infest a wide range of plants, causing damage by sucking sap and secreting honeydew, a sugary substance that can attract other pests and promote the growth of sooty mould. These pests can be particularly challenging to control due to their waxy, protective covering. Here’s what you should know about managing mealybugs:

Identification:
Mealybugs are typically small, oval-shaped insects with a white or light grey, waxy covering that gives them a cottony or powdery appearance. They can range in size from 1/16 to 1/4 inch. Mealybugs often congregate in clusters on stems, leaves, and the undersides of leaves, and they can move very slowly.

Damage:
Mealybugs feed on plant sap by inserting their needle-like mouthparts into plant tissues. This feeding weakens plants, causes leaves to yellow and wilt, and can lead to stunted growth. In addition to the direct damage they cause, mealybugs excrete honeydew, which can attract ants, wasps, and other pests and can also foster the growth of sooty mould on the plant’s surface.

Prevention and Control:
Managing mealybugs requires a combination of prevention and control strategies:

Regular Inspection: Regularly inspect your plants for signs of mealybug infestations, especially on new growth and in concealed areas.

Pruning: For light infestations, prune and dispose of infested plant parts to prevent further spread.

Mechanical Removal: Gently scrub mealybugs off plants using a soft brush or cloth dipped in soapy water.

Beneficial Insects: Encourage natural predators like ladybirds, lacewings, and parasitic wasps that feed on mealybugs.

Neem Oil: Neem oil can disrupt the life cycle of mealybugs. Apply it to plants as directed on the product label.

Insecticidal Soap: Use insecticidal soap to target mealybugs. Make sure to cover all infested areas, including hidden parts of the plant.

Cultural Practises:
Incorporate these practises to minimise mealybug infestations:

Isolate New Plants: Inspect new plants before introducing them to your garden to prevent introducing mealybugs.

Healthy Plants: Maintain plant health through proper watering, fertilisation, and soil care. Healthy plants are better equipped to resist infestations.

Prune and sanitise: regularly prune dead or infested plant material and dispose of it properly to prevent the spread of mealybugs.

Consistency and Vigilance:
Consistency in monitoring and intervention is key to managing mealybug populations. Mealybugs can reproduce rapidly, so addressing an infestation as soon as it’s detected is important to prevent it from spreading.

By combining different control methods and maintaining good garden hygiene, you can effectively manage mealybug populations and keep your plants healthy.

Earwigs

Earwigs are nocturnal insects that are often associated with their distinctive pincer-like cerci, which extend from the end of their abdomen. While they can be beneficial by consuming other pests, they can also become a nuisance in gardens when their populations grow too large. Here’s what you need to know about earwigs and how to manage them:

Identification:
Earwigs have elongated bodies, six legs, and a pair of curved cerci at the tip of their abdomen, which resemble forceps or pincers. These cerci are used for defence and mating. Earwigs can vary in colour from brown to black and may have wings, although they typically prefer to move on foot.

Damage:
Earwigs are omnivores, feeding on both plant material and insects. They can be beneficial in controlling certain pests, like aphids and caterpillars, but they can also cause damage by feeding on young plants, seedlings, flowers, and even ripe fruits. Additionally, earwigs might occasionally find their way indoors, becoming an unwelcome presence.

Prevention and Control:
To manage earwig populations in your garden:

Sanitation: Remove debris, leaf litter, and hiding spots near your garden to minimise potential habitats for earwigs.

Trapping: Place rolled-up newspaper or corrugated cardboard in the garden as traps. Earwigs will hide in these during the day, allowing you to collect and dispose of them in the morning.

Diatomaceous Earth: Sprinkle diatomaceous earth around plants to create a barrier that can deter earwigs. The sharp particles damage their exoskeletons.

Traps: Use pitfall traps (containers sunk into the soil) filled with oil or soapy water to catch and drown earwigs.

Encourage earwig-eating animals :such as birds, toads, and ground beetles as natural predators.

Cultural Practises:
Incorporate these practises to minimise earwig infestations:

Elevated Planting: Elevate planters and containers to make it more difficult for earwigs to reach your plants.

Tidy Garden: Keep your garden clean and remove debris to eliminate potential hiding spots.

Regular Inspection: Inspect your garden in the evening or early morning to catch earwigs when they are most active.

Consistency and Monitoring:
Consistent efforts to manage earwig populations are essential, as they can reproduce quickly. Monitoring your garden and taking action as needed will help prevent them from becoming a significant problem.

By employing a combination of prevention methods and control strategies, you can effectively manage earwig populations and minimise their impact on your garden.

FAQ

How do you spot pests?

Spotting pests involves checking plants for physical damage, droppings, or signs of infestation like holes, webs, or discoloration.

How can I control pests naturally?

Control pests naturally by using methods like introducing beneficial insects, using neem oil or soap sprays, practicing crop rotation, and maintaining healthy soil.

How do you control pests?

Pest control methods include using chemical pesticides, traps, physical barriers, and natural predators to manage pest populations.

How do you prevent pests from crops naturally?

Prevent pests from crops naturally by practicing good sanitation, using companion planting, employing proper irrigation techniques, and encouraging biodiversity in the garden.

You may also like